{Springbrook} Sunburst

Springbrook Nature Center is my favorite place to visit on a good weather day. Different things can be seen by switching up which paths you walk on, what the weather is like, and the season. During the Fall the landscape changes weekly!selah_candace_rose_springbrook1-1 selah_candace_rose_springbrook1-2Springbrook has gone through many changes in the past year, most of which I am loving. During this walk I found a little path that took me to a little haven full of bright yellow happiness. selah_candace_rose_springbrook1-3The little yellow flowers above remind me of the sun emblem of Rapunzel’s kingdom in Tangled. selah_candace_rose_springbrook1-4 selah_candace_rose_springbrook1-5For a couple months there was this cool tree teepee deep in the woods. I knew some boys who would have loved playing in it, but alas! It was taken down before they could visit. selah_candace_rose_springbrook1-6

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{4Js} J4 on the Floor

Full of spunk and super sweet, J4 is fast crawling and soon will be walking. Somehow I found myself with just J4 for a few hours and we had fun playing before a second, unplanned nap.selah_candace_rose_joey_1Peek-a-boo! selah_candace_rose_joey_2Happy 1st birthday, little J!! You are loved. selah_candace_rose_joey_3And happy Thanksgiving, everyone else! I pray you have a blessed time with friends and family.

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This Business of Threshing

kandihamble-com_threshing-1While Janet was in town this fall, there was the Thresher’s show in Dalton, MN, and I was invited to go check things out! Being a city born and bred girl, I kinda geeked out at all the cool old engines I saw and watching two farmers thresh wheat! WHAAAAT?! kandihamble-com_threshing-2Chaff! Many of the machines were over a hundred years old! kandihamble-com_threshing-3All the belts and gears were fascinating! And seeing how the belts are repaired because replacement belts aren’t made anymore! kandihamble-com_threshing-4The little town there was sweet, with a church, store, and red school house. kandihamble-com_threshing-5We also watched a Railroad stake being made in the blacksmith shop! kandihamble-com_threshing-6 kandihamble-com_threshing-7There was a cute little old man sitting in the General Store. kandihamble-com_threshing-8

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{Springbrook} Fall First

kandihamble_springbrook_fallfirst-1Fall is my favorite season for a couple reasons. First, THE COLORS! They are glorious! kandihamble_springbrook_fallfirst-2I also love how it’s cool (alright, in MN it can get COLD!) at night but warm during the day. kandihamble_springbrook_fallfirst-3The reeds look like they’re in ice, don’t they? This day was a PERFECT fall day! kandihamble_springbrook_fallfirst-4 kandihamble_springbrook_fallfirst-5I went down a path I don’t often take, and saw some pretty colors. kandihamble_springbrook_fallfirst-6If you would like to see more of my fall photos from Springbrook, follow me on Instagram!

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{Eagle Lake} Walking

One of the sweetest times I’ve started having this year is long walks with my friend Carol.selah_candace_rose_eaglelake_1We meet at Eagle Lake and walk, talk, pray, and laugh. We are also known to dream and cry. selah_candace_rose_eaglelake_2Each spot on this walk has a different dream, a different prayer attached with it. We wonder about the wandering, whisper heartaches, celebrate triumphs. We ask What’s Next? selah_candace_rose_eaglelake_3These walks are good for my soul.

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{Janet’s Germany} Frauenkirche Dresden

The “Frauenkirche” (Church of Our Lady) was first built in 1726-43 by George Bähr. After the bombing of Dresden in 1945, the heat was so great the sandstone church succumbed and was destroyed. The church was left in ruins for 45 years as a memorial and reminder of the war. Rebuilding was started in 1994 and the outside of the church was completed in 2004, consecrated in October 2005 once the inside was complete, and reopened.selah_candace_rose_Dresden_12The dark color of the old stones mingled with the different sized and lighter stones from the re-building resemble old scars of healed wounds, a mosaic of past and present. They also speak of overcoming hostility and hope and reconciliation. The motto of the building project is “Building bridges, living reconciliation, strengthening faith”.selah_candace_rose_Dresden_13I love how people from other countries came together to help rebuild this church, making it a symbol of reconciliation between former enemies.selah_candace_rose_Dresden_14Oh, the splendor of the Frauenkirche in Dresden! The sheer size of this church is alone amazing! The main sanctuary was closed for Mass when we first arrived, so we trekked to the top to get a bird’s eye view of Dresden.selah_candace_rose_Dresden_16From here we were also able to see the old city ruins, which are being built over so the fences block viewing from street level. I think it would have been fun to walk through there. Some of the ruins are already filled in.selah_candace_rose_Dresden_17From our perch we saw the Cathedral and Hausmannsturm in the distance. We later walked past the Cathedral and Palace it is connected to.selah_candace_rose_Dresden_18We also saw City Hall and the Driekönigskirche. We later ate at a little Mexican restaurant named Don Pancho right outside the Driekönigskirche, which was quite the experience! I never thought I’d eat authentic Mexican in Germany! The woman who owns the restaurant imports her spices from Mexico. It is a place to stop if you are ever in Dresden!selah_candace_rose_Dresden_20The Augustusbrücke is the oldest bridge in Dresden, built in 1727 by Augustus II the Strong of Poland and rebuilt in 1907. Further back is the Marienbrücke.selah_candace_rose_Dresden_21Janet is a very good tour guide. Not even her fear of heights kept her from taking us here! The heights are quite dizzy-ing, so I appreciated that Janet took us up and went out on the viewing platform. And she didn’t die! Neither did I. Or Erika.selah_candace_rose_Dresden_19 We could see pretty far, even with the fog.selah_candace_rose_Dresden_22The top half of the climb is narrow, winding hallways like this. We were lucky to be able to miss the steps going up by taking the elevator! Seeing into the center of the church, and out the windows, made the walk more interesting.selah_candace_rose_Dresden_15After spending a long time at the viewing platform, 25-ish stories up, we headed back down to see the incredible nave and down to the depths of the Frauenkirche too see the historical displays. selah_candace_rose_Dresden_23Looking from the ground floor up through the many levels of the Frauenkirche to the viewing platform. The ceiling paintings were originally painted by Giovanni Battista Grone of Venice between May and November of 1734. The paintings (and door carvings!) were painstakingly recreated based of old wedding photos and church plans that survived the war.selah_candace_rose_DresdenFrauenKirche_2cThere are original plans on display from 1726, which is how architects determined were each stone should be placed from its place in the rubble based on the stone’s medallion. selah_candace_rose_DresdenFrauenKirche_1cThe altar is glorious in size and detail. Carved from sandstone in 1738 by Johann Christian Feige, it was pieced together after WWII from more than 2,000 fragments. There are 4,876 pipes, and only a small portion are visible The smallest one is less than one centimeter and the largest one is over 5 meters. The altar shows Christ praying alone in Gethsemane with his sleeping disciples and the soldiers approaching to arrest him. A sermon unfolds in the sweeping altar with the message of God’s mercy.

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{Janet’s Germany} Dresden

selah_candace_rose_Dresden_1The day we spent in Dresden was partly cloudy and just the right temperature. We took the train in so we wouldn’t have to keep track of the car, or time! We got off the train and took a long walk through Prager Straße.
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In shame and sorrow
Remember Christians the Jewish people of this city.
In 1933, 4675 Jews lived in Dresden. 1945 there were 70.
We were silent, as their church burned, deprived of the right of citizenship as Jews, they were expelled and murdered. We did not recognize in them our brothers and sisters.
We ask for forgiveness and Shalom.
November 1988

selah_candace_rose_Dresden_3Our first stop was at Kreuzkirche (Cross Church), first built around 1168 and was dedicated to Saint Nicholas. It has been through many re-buildings, fires, and renovations from 1401 to 1945. It re-opened in1955 in its current form.
selah_candace_rose_Dresden_4Dresden is a beautiful city built along the Elbe river. Dresden has a wealth of cultural and art treasures and was the residence of sovereigns and kings starting in 1425. Although it was badly destroyed in the Dresden Bombing of 1945, it has been rebuilt and is a splendor to view. We spent some time in Dresden’s Frauenkirche, which I’ll post more about next week. selah_candace_rose_Dresden_5There is entirely too much to see in Dresden in just one day, but we did a fair amount of wandering around and enjoying the views of Elbe, walking through Theatreplatz, seeing König Johann’s statue, the Hofkirche and Royal Palace (Residenzschloss), Semperoper (Semper Opera House), Goldener Reiter, Albertinum, Dresden Academy of Fine Arts, Brühlsche Terrassen…this list would be very long if I listed everything we saw! selah_candace_rose_Dresden_6 selah_candace_rose_Dresden_7 selah_candace_rose_Dresden_8 selah_candace_rose_Dresden_9 selah_candace_rose_Dresden_10 selah_candace_rose_Dresden_11

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{Janet’s Germany} Moritzburg

Schloss Moritzburg is a Baroque palace in Moritzburg which was built between 1542 and 1546. It was a hunting lodge for Moritz, Duke of Saxony. A Prince of the House of Wettin lived here until 1945, when the postwar Soviet administration evicted Prince Ernst Heinrich of Saxony.selah_candace_rose_Moritzburg_1We only had an hour to walk around, so we didn’t take the tour, but there was plenty to see outside! Walking up to the castle is a treat and if you turn around, you will see a breath taking view of the town.
selah_candace_rose_Moritzburg_2We only had an hour to walk around, so we didn’t take the tour, but there was plenty to see outside! Walking up to the castle is a treat and if you turn around, you will see a breath taking view of the town. selah_candace_rose_Moritzburg_3The bright yellow makes the castle look cheery and the front is decorated with wooden deer heads with antlers mounted to them. There are 71 throughout the castle, most ranging from 270 to 400 years old! Most of them were purchased as gifts, but there is a 66-point red deer antler from an animal killed by Elector Frederick III of Brandenburg in 1696…which we did not see. selah_candace_rose_Moritzburg_4The statues are in the process of being cleaned, so some are dark and some look fresh and fresh and new. The grounds are kept immaculate and plenty of friendly Pomeranian geese waddled or swam over for a visit – and to see if we had food for them. We didn’t, and they soon went looking for the school children who were eating a snack on the lawn.selah_candace_rose_Moritzburg_5In 1972 Moritzburg Castle was one of the locations in the filming of the Czechoslovak-German Cinderella movie, Drei Haselnüsse für Aschenbrödel (“Three Nuts for Cinderella”), which is quite a popular movie in central Europe. Cinderella’s shoe is on display. Yes, we tried to fit into it. No, it did not fit any of us. (Which was expected!) selah_candace_rose_Moritzburg_6Cinderella is a fairy tale every little girl wishes would happen to her – a handsome prince will see past the rags, the less-than we’re told we are, and he’ll whisk her away out of the normal into the life of no need and love her forever. And the geese giggle.selah_candace_rose_Moritzburg_7As we left with ice cream cones in hand, the sun came out making the Schloss look even more striking!
selah_candace_rose_Moritzburg

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