{Janet’s Germany} Porcelain Manufacturer

Meissen is famous for the manufacture of porcelain. Meissen porcelain was the first high quality porcelain to be produced outside of the Orient, established by King Augustus the Strong in 1710. The mathematician and physicist Ehrenfried Walther Graf von Tschirnhaus and the alchemist Johann Friedrich Boettger had succeeded in manufacturing the first white European porcelain in 1708. This porcelain was called “White Gold” was of great significance, because of the Chinese monopoly in this market.

Visiting the porcelain manufacturing building and taking the tour was one of the highest of highlights of my trip – so much so that I went through twice! This will easily be the longest post about my trip because there’s so much I learned! Once going through the tour made it apparent WHY Meissen porcelain is SO famous and WHY is COSTS SO MUCH!!selah_candace_rose_Porcelain_01The onion pattern is the most famous pattern created, and has been used by many other companies trying to imitate Meissen Porcelain. Its signature logo, the crossed swords, was introduced in 1720 to protect its production and was added to the onion design. The crossed swords is one of the oldest trademarks in existence and is on each piece created here.selah_candace_rose_Porcelain_02Not only dish ware is created – large pieces such as this sad lion have been created and a selection can be seen in the upstairs museum. The yellow tea service set was made in 1722. selah_candace_rose_Porcelain_03There are also many figurines with intricate details of both molding and painting.selah_candace_rose_Porcelain_04The teapot with all the flowers? Each flower was individually hand made and applied to the tea pot and then hand painted.selah_candace_rose_Porcelain_05A sculpture of discarded pieces is on display and was amazing to look at each side and see all the little hidden elements!selah_candace_rose_Porcelain_06On the first stop of the tour, we watched a short video showing how the elements are mined, broken down, and then mixed together in a water slurry. After the 3 ingredients are well mixed, the water is spun out leave the clay which can be stored up to nine months before being created into a delicate porcelain something. selah_candace_rose_Porcelain_07I was mesmerized in the second room by watching the clay being formed by hand into a plain cup and then formed in the centuries old mold, removing excess clay to form the delicately thin clay. The clay dries in it’s mold for 30 minutes and is then removed. The base and handle are added using slip (some of the clay without the excess water taken out). After firing, each piece is only 65% of it’s original size! selah_candace_rose_Porcelain_08 selah_candace_rose_Porcelain_09In another room of the tour, we witnessed another artist hand carving part of a statue. We also saw how each little ivy leaf is created in a mold and then added to the statue with slip, piece by piece. Some details, like roses and more detailed flowers, are created lovingly by hand – without any kind of mold! selah_candace_rose_Porcelain_10 selah_candace_rose_Porcelain_11The third room of the tour taught how each piece is hand painted, how the colors used change dramatically during firing, and there were many examples of how paints change in firing. The steps to just make one plate are extensive, and require many years of training for each artist. When a piece is painted before firing, any paint that is applied cannot be removed, so perfection is a must!selah_candace_rose_Porcelain_12The gold paint used is 90% pure gold and looks very dark before firing. After a piece with gold is fired, the gold is hand polished to give it the bright lustre seen at the bottom of the sample plate. It is only after these steps that a piece can be sold! selah_candace_rose_Porcelain_13The last stop of the tour before the shops was watching another artist paint an already glazed and fired plate. At this time, paint is not permanent until it is fired. Multiple colors require multiple firings as only one color at a time is applied. The only exception to this is in scenery, which is all painted at once.

For more information on the history of porcelain manufacturing in Meissen, check out their website!

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{Janet’s Germany} Krögis

selah_candace_rose_Krogis_1 Krögis is where it all began. Janet moved to Germany to help a mission organization in their new building, which needed renovation and a LOT of cleaning! Janet eventually moved on to a new job in Germany and moved to Meißen for her job.selah_candace_rose_Krogis_2 It wasn’t a far drive, so she took me out to the Steiger base to see it! We both have friends there, so it was a relaxing few hours of visiting and wandering around checking out all the work they have done and are continuing to do!selah_candace_rose_Krogis_3 Most of my pictures were lost form this day due to a fight with a computer, but I was able to salvage some of my favorites, which are mostly from the gardens. Gardens are definitely one of my happy places, and Germany is filled with beautiful gardens!selah_candace_rose_Krogis_4 selah_candace_rose_Krogis_5

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Miracles Happen Fest 2016

My church’s band, Vested Worship, played at Miracles Happen Fest at Ironwood Springs Christian Ranch in Stewartville, MN. They opened for Tenth Avenue North on Saturday.selah_candace_rose_MH16F_01The Camp Director, Bob Badwell, was incredibly generous and provided church members with tickets to come to the Festival. This was exciting news for a friend and I because we weren’t going to be going due to finances. We carpooled with some friends and had a fun road trip to Stewartville.

The drive was hilarious and went by quickly. The sky was clear until we reached Rochester. Then a deluge hit and we all got a shower with lunch. But we dried off before we reached Ironwood Springs; so did the skies.selah_candace_rose_MH16F_02Painted rocks inscribed with verses graced various places throughout the camp, which was a favorite features at Ironwood Springs. There was so much to see so Val, Katelyn, Michelle, and I set off to explore. We walked through the art and craft fair, checked out the food and had some treats. There were many activities including tree climbing, petting zoo, laser tag, mini golf, a Ferris wheel, zip lines, paint ball and more. Val was excited about the pony rides, which had sadly ended before we arrived.selah_candace_rose_MH16F_04We saw Clyde the Camel, who seemed to love Michelle. He walked over to her, ignoring everyone else. Another fun stop was at the Ole Red Barn for Western photos complete with costumes and all sorts of props! This isn’t normally something I do, but it was pretty fun! selah_candace_rose_MH16F_03After seeing the festival events, the four of us walked through the grounds taking in the beauty. Even with all the activity, the grounds felt peaceful. selah_candace_rose_MH16F_05 There were sweet little touches of love throughout the ranch including little gnomes and a bridge over the river that runs through the property. The volunteers were all helpful and friendly, adding to the peaceful atmosphere. selah_candace_rose_MH16F_06 Finally it was time for the evening’s music to start! Vested Worship started the evening of music with some worship to draw people in. selah_candace_rose_MH16F_08 selah_candace_rose_MH16F_09selah_candace_rose_MH16F_07After Vested Worship completed their set, Jeff Deyo, formerly of Sonicflood, took the stage. He was very energetic and more people trickled to the stage. After Jeff Deyo came Sarah Reeves. She kept her set low key with a keyboard and guitarist; her songs were calming. Something about her seems to familiar, but I haven’t figured out why yet. She reminds me of Ellie Holcomb.selah_candace_rose_MH16F_10As Sarah ended, the promise of chicken and ice cream and ice cold water lured Michelle and I away from the stage and we were caught in a downpour of rain. It rained long and hard, completing our second shower for the day. Thankfully, many tents were set up and we were able to stay under one for the worst of the rain. We made it back to the stage in time for Tenth Avenue North at 9pm. selah_candace_rose_MH16F_11While the whole day at Ironwood Springs was fun, Tenth Avenue North was the highlight. The message they bring to the audience is so needed. The lead singer, Mike, is funny (hello, prom queen disciples!). Their message rings true and was refreshing. selah_candace_rose_MH16F_12Really, it was more like hanging out with friends and singing loud than attending a concert. “We’re not here to sing TO you, but to sing WITH you.”
selah_candace_rose_MH16F_13Here are some of the songs they sang with links to the music videos. I hope they encourage you as much as they have encouraged me.
You Are More – The labels we create for ourselves and others should not define us, unless we use Child of God – the one true label. Mike said as Tenth Avenue North, they are not Musicians (with the labels of famous, special, etc.) but Children of God who happen to play music.
Struggle – As children raising our hands meant we wanted our parent to come pick us up. Mike compared this to us raising our hands in worship to the King of kings. Think to how quickly a parent runs to pick up their child when those precious little hands are raised. How much more does our Heavenly Father run to us when we lift our hands to him?
Worn – Life is messy. Often we do not receive resolution of events in the world or in personal life. Life doesn’t turn out perfectly all the time, many things are not resolved, but God redeems those times. He uses them for His glory. They are not a waste, but a time to lean even closer on God and trust him and his plan for my life. God is not a God of resolution, but a God of Redemption.
I Have This Hope – When life slams me against the wall, how am I going to respond? “So I have this hope in the depth of my soul. In the flood or the fire. You’re with me. You won’t let go.” Yes and amen!
selah_candace_rose_MH16F_14Driving home was a hoot (exploding salad, extra burger, and frostys thankyouverymuch). It was so late and I was so tired. But it was worth it.

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Field Day 2016

selah_candace_rose_FieldDay_01A couple of years ago, Jordan wanted to have a field day with his cousins, which has started a wonderful tradition. This was the Third Annual Russie Field Day. Cousins, aunts, uncles, brothers, sisters, and Grandma were in attendance. selah_candace_rose_FieldDay_02There were some non-water races and then water joined the fun. It was super hot out, so the water was a welcomed addition. selah_candace_rose_FieldDay_03J4 and I played spectators, since he was too young and someone had to keep him from falling face-first into the pool (again). He didn’t seem to mind too much since he received his own little J4-safe pool and he got to eat lunch in his pool! selah_candace_rose_FieldDay_04 selah_candace_rose_FieldDay_05 selah_candace_rose_FieldDay_06There were also some side sand-games, played by Sam and Tyler before they joined in the water games. These games were cake making and hole digging. selah_candace_rose_FieldDay_07 selah_candace_rose_FieldDay_08One one the funnest games to watch was a summer spin on Duck, Duck, Gray Duck. It goes Drip, Drip, Dump and involves dripping and pouring water and chasing. It was hilarious to watch! selah_candace_rose_FieldDay_10Field Day always concludes with snacks, and this year there was also grilled pizza!

{Janet’s Germany} Frauenkirche Meissen

selah_candace_rose_Meissen_Frauenkirche_BellsThe bell tower of Meissen’s Frauenkirche can be seen from Janet’s living room. The porcelain bells are made in 1929 to commemorate Meissen’s 1,000 year jubilee. The bells toll all day long and can be heard all over. I was a bit worried at first that the bells would keep me awake all night, but I slept through them each night. I got used to telling time by them (they rang every 15 minutes!) and hearing for the tolls that rang for 10 minutes which announced it was either 7am, noon, 5pm, or 6pm. Then at certain half-hours during the day, tunes would ring instead of the usual half hour tone.

Coming home, I miss the bells.selah_candace_rose_MeissenFrauenkirche_1The Frauenkirche Meissen was first mentioned in history in 1205 by Bishop Dietrich II and is located in the old market place. After a fire broke out, the church was rebuilt, completed in 1450 in the late Gothic style. The Baroque cupola and a tower keeper’s apartment were built after a lightning strike in 1547. selah_candace_rose_MeissenFrauenkirche_2The inside is beautiful in its simple elegance. The ceilings mimic Albrechtsburg’s and in each area the flowers on the ceiling are slightly different. There are many magnificent stained glass windows and a beautiful altar. selah_candace_rose_MeissenFrauenkirche_3Janet related an interesting tidbit about this church. Several years ago, the building started splitting in half. The church was closed immediately for safety and the cause of the breaking about down the middle was investigated. It was discovered that the church had been built half on stone, half on sand! It reminds me of Matthew 7:24-27. The building was under construction for almost four years to correct this and re-opened the week before my arrival. selah_candace_rose_MeissenFrauenkirche_4

“Therefore everyone who hears these words of mine and puts them into practice is like a wise man who built his house on the rock. The rain came down, the streams rose, and the winds blew and beat against that house; yet it did not fall, because it had its foundation on the rock. But everyone who hears these words of mine and does not put them into practice is like a foolish man who built his house on sand. The rain came down, the streams rose, and the winds blew and beat against that house, and it fell with a great crash.”

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{Janet’s Germany} Albrechtsburg

selah_candace_rose_MeissenBurb_03Albrechtsburg is Germany’s oldest castle and was a trendsetter in it’s time! Even now, it is amazing to set eyes on. Albrechtsburg overlooks the city of Meissen and towers above the mighty Elbe river.selah_candace_rose_MeissenBurb_01Albrechtsburg was incredible to tour! Although the audio tour gets a little long in the end, it was interesting learning so much about the castle and Germany’s history. In one room, we had to wear slippers to help preserve the original wood flooring, which was beautiful. selah_candace_rose_MeissenBurb_02Albrechtsburg was redecorated in the 19th century with murals depicting Saxon history, which were really neat to see as I heard about it. The first one pictured was the coronation of a king. The second one depicts the Duke kidnapping the two princes, while their nursemaid was trying to protect them. selah_candace_rose_MeissenBurb_06The Wettin brothers Ernst and Albrecht commissioned master builder Arnold von Westfalen to build the castle to be a sign of power and wealth. He succeeded and also set European standards, a trendsetter in terms of architecture, vaulting, window and staircase design, among other things.selah_candace_rose_MeissenBurb_04The castle was built between 1472 and 1525 and is built in the late-Gothic style and was the first castle built solely as a residence. selah_candace_rose_MeissenBurb_05selah_candace_rose_MeissenBurb_08The Prince’s Chapel was very beautiful and lavishly painted. It was designed with six pillars, each to represent an aspect of God’s faithfulness. The room has five pillars and a spot for the believer to stand, becoming the sixth pillar. selah_candace_rose_MeissenBurb_07The ceilings are most amazing. Each room was painted differently; there was one room which wasn’t painted at all. It was quite stunning in it’s unpainted glory. selah_candace_rose_MeissenBurb_09Meissen porcelain was made inside this castle for 150 years, established in 1710 by King Augustus II the Strong; however, the production as making the castle literally fall apart, so the factory was moved to it’s own location in downtown Meissen in 1863. selah_candace_rose_MeissenBurb_10 selah_candace_rose_MeissenBurb_11Even the walls in each room are painted with it’s own unique decoration. The windows were all made in either a diamond or circle cutouts. This was done so if a window broke only the broken pieces had to be replaced, not the whole window! selah_candace_rose_MeissenBurb_12The spiral staircase was one of my favorite features of the castle. This is the top of the stairs; and almost to the bottom, where they curve out instead of in; and looking into the center of the spiral from the bottom of the stairs.selah_candace_rose_MeissenBurb_14“The Artist who does not conceive of a staircase as something fantastic is not an artist.”
– Gio Ponti selah_candace_rose_MeissenBurb_13Here is a link to watch a quick video about the castle.

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{Janet’s Germany} Meissen Cathedral

selah_candace_rose_MeissenDom_1Janet and I took a tour bus up to Castle Hill, where Albrechtsburg and the Cathedral still stand. King Heinrich I founded the fortress “Misnia” on the castle hill high above the Elbe river in 929. The Cathedral was built between 1260 -1425. The twin towers were added later in 1909.
selah_candace_rose_MeissenDom_2The Meissen Cathedral or Church of St John and St Donatus (German: Meißner Dom) is a Gothic church in Meissen in Saxony. In 1581 the Meissen diocese was dissolved in the course of the Protestant Reformation, and the church was used by the Protestant Church since. It is the cathedral church of the Evangelical-Lutheran Church of Saxony. selah_candace_rose_MeissenDom_3We did not make it inside except for the Room of Silence because we decided to tour the castle first and that took long enough that we only had a few minutes to catch the last bus back down to Meissen.selah_candace_rose_MeissenDom_4 selah_candace_rose_MeissenDom_5 selah_candace_rose_MeissenDom_6There is a lovely little courtyard outside that we spent a lovely minute in. selah_candace_rose_MeissenDom_7This bridge is the second oldest bridge still standing in Germany, leading up to Albrechtsburg and the Cathedral. selah_candace_rose_MeissenDom_8 Next week I will take you on a tour inside Albrechtsburg, the Meissen Castle!selah_candace_rose_MeissenDOM

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{Janet’s Germany} Meissen

selah_candace_rose_Meissen_01Meißen (mīs´ən) is a city in Saxony, East Central Germany. It is on the Elbe River. Janet has made her home here for the past 5 years.

selah_candace_rose_Meissen_02 selah_candace_rose_Meissen_03Janet lives in a wonderful house that seems to go up and up and up! Up in the attic is where I stayed; it was the coolest place in the house! In the basement, Janet’s landlords cure meat for their catering business. selah_candace_rose_Meissen_04Getting to Germany had a rough start. The airline didn’t have their paperwork in order and once it was finally approved, the pilots had disappeared! We landed so late that everyone on the flight missed their connecting flights. I ended up not getting to Janet until almost 7 pm, when I was supposed to be picked up at 1:40! selah_candace_rose_Meissen_06selah_candace_rose_Meissen_07We stopped at a Lidl for some take home dinner and then we arrived home and took the hike up all the flights of stairs with all the luggage. Oi! After we ate it was bed time for me and work time for Janet. selah_candace_rose_Meissen_05The next day we walked around Meissen and Janet took me to her favorite restaurant for dinner. It is a little Vietnamese place close to Janet’s home. The owner has the most beautiful 350 year old bonsai tree! selah_candace_rose_Meissen_08Germans take pride in the cleanliness and beauty of their cities. It seemed like every window had a window box with beautiful flowers and wildflowers grew all over! The many trees gave shade to walkers. selah_candace_rose_Meissen_09 selah_candace_rose_Meissen_10Here are some fun facts about Meissen:
Founded in 929 by Henry of Saxony (later German king as Henry I).
The Albrechtsburg (15th cent.), a large castle, dominates the city.
Meissen is famous for its delicate figurines (often called “Dresden” china), since 1710.
selah_candace_rose_Meissen_11The trials with flying Condor was made up by the beauty of Germany. While I won’t fly with them again, I am already planning another trip to see more of Germany! Be looking for more about my Germany trip in the upcoming weeks!selah_candace_rose_Meissen_12

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{Concerts} Michael W. Smith and Amy Grant

Ever since I’ve had a job, Michael W. Smith’s Christmas concert has been a Christmas tradition for me. I missed a couple years due to working on Saturdays, but last year I was able to make it, and convinced my friend Joyce to go with me! Usually I get front row tickets, but this year we were waaaaaaaaaay back in the back. But it was still so much fun and the night did not disappoint!selah_candace_rose_MWSCM_1 The orchestra and singers were amazing! I always love when one of the ladies sing All Is Well. I’d never seen Amy Grant in concert, so that was neat!selah_candace_rose_MWSCM_2 It was a fabulous night!selah_candace_rose_MWSCM_3