{Janet’s Germany} Frauenkirche Meissen

selah_candace_rose_Meissen_Frauenkirche_BellsThe bell tower of Meissen’s Frauenkirche can be seen from Janet’s living room. The porcelain bells are made in 1929 to commemorate Meissen’s 1,000 year jubilee. The bells toll all day long and can be heard all over. I was a bit worried at first that the bells would keep me awake all night, but I slept through them each night. I got used to telling time by them (they rang every 15 minutes!) and hearing for the tolls that rang for 10 minutes which announced it was either 7am, noon, 5pm, or 6pm. Then at certain half-hours during the day, tunes would ring instead of the usual half hour tone.

Coming home, I miss the bells.selah_candace_rose_MeissenFrauenkirche_1The Frauenkirche Meissen was first mentioned in history in 1205 by Bishop Dietrich II and is located in the old market place. After a fire broke out, the church was rebuilt, completed in 1450 in the late Gothic style. The Baroque cupola and a tower keeper’s apartment were built after a lightning strike in 1547. selah_candace_rose_MeissenFrauenkirche_2The inside is beautiful in its simple elegance. The ceilings mimic Albrechtsburg’s and in each area the flowers on the ceiling are slightly different. There are many magnificent stained glass windows and a beautiful altar. selah_candace_rose_MeissenFrauenkirche_3Janet related an interesting tidbit about this church. Several years ago, the building started splitting in half. The church was closed immediately for safety and the cause of the breaking about down the middle was investigated. It was discovered that the church had been built half on stone, half on sand! It reminds me of Matthew 7:24-27. The building was under construction for almost four years to correct this and re-opened the week before my arrival. selah_candace_rose_MeissenFrauenkirche_4

“Therefore everyone who hears these words of mine and puts them into practice is like a wise man who built his house on the rock. The rain came down, the streams rose, and the winds blew and beat against that house; yet it did not fall, because it had its foundation on the rock. But everyone who hears these words of mine and does not put them into practice is like a foolish man who built his house on sand. The rain came down, the streams rose, and the winds blew and beat against that house, and it fell with a great crash.”

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Hitting 60

Dad turned 60 this year. Dad wanted his birthday dinner at White Castle (yum!) but … we the family had other ideas. Everyone one Dad and Mom’s church and most of our family who was in town gathered at La Casita to celebrate. After dinner we went home to open gifts.

and we were served by Jesus. 😉

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Where is Your Sting?

When the perishable has been clothed with the imperishable, and the mortal with immortality, then the saying that is written will come true: “Death has been swallowed up in victory.” Where, O death, is your victory? Where, O death, is your sting?
1 Corinthians 15:54-55

Throughout the evening, we completed stations that show how Jesus’ brokenness on the cross has provided our healing, how the stone in front of the tomb hid life, how we can celebrate because of Jesus’ victory over death, and how we are called to spread this light to the rest of the world. As the evening came to a close, we finished with a time of worship and community communion.

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Here is a list of the stations we had with links to the verses we used to create and guide the evening.

Beauty in Brokenness
Mark 15:37-41

Stone Rolled Away
Mark 15:46-47; 16:1-3

From Darkness to Light
Mark 16:15-16

Celebration Station
Mark 16:9-14

Victorious
1 Corinthians 15:54-55

Forsaken on Good Friday

Forsaken is the Good Friday service at Calvary Church. It was a very visual, moving night.

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On Good Friday, the world truly believed hope was lost. How could Jesus really be the savior when he couldn’t even save himself. 2000 years later we relate to this hopelessness with the devastation we see around us. We invite you to come explore Good Friday in a new, visually engaging experience of music, art, dance, and uncensored questions.

via Forsaken – A Good Friday Experience.