This Business of Threshing

kandihamble-com_threshing-1While Janet was in town this fall, there was the Thresher’s show in Dalton, MN, and I was invited to go check things out! Being a city born and bred girl, I kinda geeked out at all the cool old engines I saw and watching two farmers thresh wheat! WHAAAAT?! kandihamble-com_threshing-2Chaff! Many of the machines were over a hundred years old! kandihamble-com_threshing-3All the belts and gears were fascinating! And seeing how the belts are repaired because replacement belts aren’t made anymore! kandihamble-com_threshing-4The little town there was sweet, with a church, store, and red school house. kandihamble-com_threshing-5We also watched a Railroad stake being made in the blacksmith shop! kandihamble-com_threshing-6 kandihamble-com_threshing-7There was a cute little old man sitting in the General Store. kandihamble-com_threshing-8

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{Janet’s Germany} Bamberg

selah_candace_rose_Bamberg_01The 2011 Three Musketeers was filmed here at the Alte Hofhaltung in Bamberg…now I must watch it again! We walked past the old town hall, which was closed for renovations.selah_candace_rose_Bamberg_02Interesting tidbit: In 1459 the first book printed in the German language was published in Bamberg.selah_candace_rose_Bamberg_03

“To commemorate the Jewish citizens and those who have done during the National – Socialist violent domination resisted, ignored, persecuted and murdered.”

The old town hall is opposite the Queen Kunigunda statue on the Alte Rathaus bridge; they are just down the road from the New Residence.selah_candace_rose_Bamberg_04I wandered through the royal Rose Garden of the New Residence Bamberg, which was first created in 1703. In 1733 the garden was laid out the way it is today by designer Balthasar Neumann under the direction of Prince-Bishop Friedrich Carl von Schönborn.selah_candace_rose_Bamberg_05 copyThe sculptures were completed in the winter of 1760/61, but have been replaced by copies to preserve the originals. Some of the roses are the most beautiful I have ever seen. selah_candace_rose_Bamberg_06The garden is lined with lime tress and around 4500 roses bloom every summer! selah_candace_rose_Bamberg_07There is also a wonderful view of Michaelsberg Abbey. selah_candace_rose_Bamberg_08The Bamberg Cathedral (official name Bamberger Dom St. Peter und St. Georg) was completed in the 13th century. It is a late Romanesque building with four large towers. It was founded in 1002 by Emperor Henry II and finished in 1012. In 1081 it was partially destroyed, but was reconsecrated in 1111 and received its present late-Romanesque form in the 13th century. selah_candace_rose_Bamberg_09The Cathedral took so long to be constructed that several styles were used in different parts of the cathedral: Romanesque, Gothic, and in the middle is the Transitional style; this is the style which is characteristic of the nave.selah_candace_rose_Bamberg_11^ This is my favorite picture of my entire trip. It is like The Past shining light to show the way for Now and The Future. We can learn from Past (if we want to) and it will guide us to a better future. However, God MUST be a part of Present and Future for Past to guide in any way.

The Second Coming of Christ is a fresco in the apse of the east choir and was painted by Karl Caspar in 1927/28. In the west choir stands The Crucifixion of Christ; it is gold plated limewood plated and was created by Justus Glesker in 1649.selah_candace_rose_Bamberg_10One more  treasure of the cathedral is an equestrian statue, the Bamberg Horseman (Bamberger Reiter). It was created around 1235 by an unknown craftsman, and it is unknown who the rider is, although there are many theories about that. You can read more about it here. selah_candace_rose_Bamberg_12From the Cathedral’s brochure:
In Bamberg Cathedral, the central house of worship in the diocese of Bamberg, God is our opposite and our host. We are all invited to accept Him and His presence.

Space
created,
to save Him,
to touch Him,
to know He is with us.

Here He hears our prayers,
here we celebrate Him,
here you are close to Him,
here you are in His presence.

We are creations,
He is the creator,
We are the people,
He is God.

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{Janet’s Germany} Porcelain Manufacturer

Meissen is famous for the manufacture of porcelain. Meissen porcelain was the first high quality porcelain to be produced outside of the Orient, established by King Augustus the Strong in 1710. The mathematician and physicist Ehrenfried Walther Graf von Tschirnhaus and the alchemist Johann Friedrich Boettger had succeeded in manufacturing the first white European porcelain in 1708. This porcelain was called “White Gold” was of great significance, because of the Chinese monopoly in this market.

Visiting the porcelain manufacturing building and taking the tour was one of the highest of highlights of my trip – so much so that I went through twice! This will easily be the longest post about my trip because there’s so much I learned! Once going through the tour made it apparent WHY Meissen porcelain is SO famous and WHY is COSTS SO MUCH!!selah_candace_rose_Porcelain_01The onion pattern is the most famous pattern created, and has been used by many other companies trying to imitate Meissen Porcelain. Its signature logo, the crossed swords, was introduced in 1720 to protect its production and was added to the onion design. The crossed swords is one of the oldest trademarks in existence and is on each piece created here.selah_candace_rose_Porcelain_02Not only dish ware is created – large pieces such as this sad lion have been created and a selection can be seen in the upstairs museum. The yellow tea service set was made in 1722. selah_candace_rose_Porcelain_03There are also many figurines with intricate details of both molding and painting.selah_candace_rose_Porcelain_04The teapot with all the flowers? Each flower was individually hand made and applied to the tea pot and then hand painted.selah_candace_rose_Porcelain_05A sculpture of discarded pieces is on display and was amazing to look at each side and see all the little hidden elements!selah_candace_rose_Porcelain_06On the first stop of the tour, we watched a short video showing how the elements are mined, broken down, and then mixed together in a water slurry. After the 3 ingredients are well mixed, the water is spun out leave the clay which can be stored up to nine months before being created into a delicate porcelain something. selah_candace_rose_Porcelain_07I was mesmerized in the second room by watching the clay being formed by hand into a plain cup and then formed in the centuries old mold, removing excess clay to form the delicately thin clay. The clay dries in it’s mold for 30 minutes and is then removed. The base and handle are added using slip (some of the clay without the excess water taken out). After firing, each piece is only 65% of it’s original size! selah_candace_rose_Porcelain_08 selah_candace_rose_Porcelain_09In another room of the tour, we witnessed another artist hand carving part of a statue. We also saw how each little ivy leaf is created in a mold and then added to the statue with slip, piece by piece. Some details, like roses and more detailed flowers, are created lovingly by hand – without any kind of mold! selah_candace_rose_Porcelain_10 selah_candace_rose_Porcelain_11The third room of the tour taught how each piece is hand painted, how the colors used change dramatically during firing, and there were many examples of how paints change in firing. The steps to just make one plate are extensive, and require many years of training for each artist. When a piece is painted before firing, any paint that is applied cannot be removed, so perfection is a must!selah_candace_rose_Porcelain_12The gold paint used is 90% pure gold and looks very dark before firing. After a piece with gold is fired, the gold is hand polished to give it the bright lustre seen at the bottom of the sample plate. It is only after these steps that a piece can be sold! selah_candace_rose_Porcelain_13The last stop of the tour before the shops was watching another artist paint an already glazed and fired plate. At this time, paint is not permanent until it is fired. Multiple colors require multiple firings as only one color at a time is applied. The only exception to this is in scenery, which is all painted at once.

For more information on the history of porcelain manufacturing in Meissen, check out their website!

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{Janet’s Germany} Frauenkirche Meissen

selah_candace_rose_Meissen_Frauenkirche_BellsThe bell tower of Meissen’s Frauenkirche can be seen from Janet’s living room. The porcelain bells are made in 1929 to commemorate Meissen’s 1,000 year jubilee. The bells toll all day long and can be heard all over. I was a bit worried at first that the bells would keep me awake all night, but I slept through them each night. I got used to telling time by them (they rang every 15 minutes!) and hearing for the tolls that rang for 10 minutes which announced it was either 7am, noon, 5pm, or 6pm. Then at certain half-hours during the day, tunes would ring instead of the usual half hour tone.

Coming home, I miss the bells.selah_candace_rose_MeissenFrauenkirche_1The Frauenkirche Meissen was first mentioned in history in 1205 by Bishop Dietrich II and is located in the old market place. After a fire broke out, the church was rebuilt, completed in 1450 in the late Gothic style. The Baroque cupola and a tower keeper’s apartment were built after a lightning strike in 1547. selah_candace_rose_MeissenFrauenkirche_2The inside is beautiful in its simple elegance. The ceilings mimic Albrechtsburg’s and in each area the flowers on the ceiling are slightly different. There are many magnificent stained glass windows and a beautiful altar. selah_candace_rose_MeissenFrauenkirche_3Janet related an interesting tidbit about this church. Several years ago, the building started splitting in half. The church was closed immediately for safety and the cause of the breaking about down the middle was investigated. It was discovered that the church had been built half on stone, half on sand! It reminds me of Matthew 7:24-27. The building was under construction for almost four years to correct this and re-opened the week before my arrival. selah_candace_rose_MeissenFrauenkirche_4

“Therefore everyone who hears these words of mine and puts them into practice is like a wise man who built his house on the rock. The rain came down, the streams rose, and the winds blew and beat against that house; yet it did not fall, because it had its foundation on the rock. But everyone who hears these words of mine and does not put them into practice is like a foolish man who built his house on sand. The rain came down, the streams rose, and the winds blew and beat against that house, and it fell with a great crash.”

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{Janet’s Germany} Meissen Cathedral

selah_candace_rose_MeissenDom_1Janet and I took a tour bus up to Castle Hill, where Albrechtsburg and the Cathedral still stand. King Heinrich I founded the fortress “Misnia” on the castle hill high above the Elbe river in 929. The Cathedral was built between 1260 -1425. The twin towers were added later in 1909.
selah_candace_rose_MeissenDom_2The Meissen Cathedral or Church of St John and St Donatus (German: Meißner Dom) is a Gothic church in Meissen in Saxony. In 1581 the Meissen diocese was dissolved in the course of the Protestant Reformation, and the church was used by the Protestant Church since. It is the cathedral church of the Evangelical-Lutheran Church of Saxony. selah_candace_rose_MeissenDom_3We did not make it inside except for the Room of Silence because we decided to tour the castle first and that took long enough that we only had a few minutes to catch the last bus back down to Meissen.selah_candace_rose_MeissenDom_4 selah_candace_rose_MeissenDom_5 selah_candace_rose_MeissenDom_6There is a lovely little courtyard outside that we spent a lovely minute in. selah_candace_rose_MeissenDom_7This bridge is the second oldest bridge still standing in Germany, leading up to Albrechtsburg and the Cathedral. selah_candace_rose_MeissenDom_8 Next week I will take you on a tour inside Albrechtsburg, the Meissen Castle!selah_candace_rose_MeissenDOM

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